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16 More HTML Elements for Web Designers

HTML has only a few dozen elements, but we busy developers often forget to use the right tag for the job in hand. It’s all too easy to add a <div> or a <span> when there are more suitable alternatives. —Craig Buckler

This chapter covers

  • Checking out some underused but important HTML elements
  • Linking to files on your site
  • Linking to a specific element on a page
  • Adding special characters and comments

You may have noticed that after a flurry of HTML-related activity in the early chapters of the book, subsequent chapters had a decidedly CSS flavor. That's not too much of a surprise, because after you know a few basic elements such as <div>, <p>, and <span>, you can hang a lot of CSS baggage on them and create some fine-looking web pages. But there's more to HTML than these basic elements. You saw a few useful page structure elements in Chapter 11, but in this chapter, you'll extend your HTML know-how even further with elements for everything from abbreviations to variables, advanced uses of the <a> element, adding nonkeyboard characters to your pages, and even adding comments to make your code more readable. It's a regular HTML extravaganza!

Lesson 16.1: Other Text-Level Elements You Should Know

Covers: Text-level elements

Online:

<abbr>

HTML

<cite>

HTML

<code>

HTML

<dfn>

HTML

<kbd>

HTML

<mark>

HTML

<pre>

HTML

<s>

HTML

<samp>

HTML

<small>

HTML

<sub>

HTML

<sup>

HTML

<time>

HTML

<u>

HTML

<var>

HTML

More about Links

Linking to Local Files

Lesson 16.2: Linking to the Same Page

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